uispeccoll:

Mini Monday!

I’ve seen a lot of almanacs floating around both in our department and on the web, so I just wanted to share one more.  This bright green and gilded little almanac is for the year 1836, and contains everything from holidays to portraits.  What’s most impressive: you can hold it on the tip of your finger!

Almanac, 1836.  Charlotte Smith Uncatalogued Minitatures

-Laura H. 

ancientart:

Prehistoric Aboriginal hand stencil rock art. These photos were taken at the Mutawintji National Park, in the NSW Australian outback. The hands shown in the third photo are thought to have been those of a child. 

Courtesy of Beppie K.

historicaltimes:

Goodbye Kiss, Pennsylvania Station, 1944. Photo by Alfred Eisenstaedt.

historicaltimes:

Goodbye Kiss, Pennsylvania Station, 1944. Photo by Alfred Eisenstaedt.

ancientart:

A quick look at: smiting scenes in ancient Egyptian art. Why are they significant?

Both of the shown examples above are of Ramesses III at Medinet Habu. The first shows Ramesses smiting the enemies of Egypt before Amon-Re, who hands him a curved sword; the second image shows him smiting Canaanite enemies. 

The smiting scene is a traditional symbol of kingship in ancient Egypt, which is datable back to the Predynastic period, and is symbolic of a victorious king. These scenes include the king raising a weapon over the head of an enemy (or a large groups of them as shown in the first photo), ready to smite them. Their hair is often grabbed from above to hold them in place for their execution. These representations grew to also include lists of the conquered enemies, and reached their peak in the New Kingdom, where the inclusion of an anthropomorphic deity became standard (photo one). 

These scenes reinforced the king’s control over chaos, symbolically representing the bringing of justice (maat) to the defeated, chaotic enemy.

A few other examples:

  • One of the earliest examples, the ivory label of King Den, which was found in his tomb in Abydos, and dates to 3000 BCE. Den is shown to be striking down an Asiatic tribesman, with an inscription reading: ”The first occasion of smiting the East”. This artifact is currently at the British Museum.
  • Thutmose III at Karnak, presenting the Battle of Megiddo of the 15th century BCE. Here Thutmose III is shown to be smiting Canaanite enemies.

The first photo is courtesy of Kenzyb, and the second, arancidamoeba. S. Bar, D. Kahn & J.J. Shirley’s publication Egypt, Canaan and Israel: History, Imperialism, Ideology and Literature: Proceedings of a Conference at the University of Haifa (2011) was of use when writing up this post.

wtf-fun-factss:

Candle Clocks - WTF fun facts

wtf-fun-factss:

Candle Clocks - WTF fun facts


Technical Sergeant William E. Thomas and Private First Class Joseph Jackson prepared a gift of special “Easter Eggs” for Adolph Hitler and the German Army.  Scrawling such messages on artillery shells in World War II was one way in which artillery soldiers could humorously express their dislike of the enemy. Easter, 1945
(Source)

Technical Sergeant William E. Thomas and Private First Class Joseph Jackson prepared a gift of special “Easter Eggs” for Adolph Hitler and the German Army.  Scrawling such messages on artillery shells in World War II was one way in which artillery soldiers could humorously express their dislike of the enemy. Easter, 1945

(Source)

A single tooth can tell a lot about ancient people →

archaeologicalnews:

What can you learn from a single tooth? Quite a lot, actually.

University of Toronto archaeologist Susan Pfeiffer and an international team of scholars are recovering DNA as well as chemical isotopes from ancient American Indian teeth to sort out what happened in the northern Iroquoian…

thisblueboy:

Attributed to Hagesandros, Athenedoros and Polydoros, Laocoon and his Sons, Early First Century B.C.E., Vatican Museums, Photo by Catherine Hadler

thisblueboy:

Attributed to Hagesandros, Athenedoros and Polydoros, Laocoon and his Sons, Early First Century B.C.E., Vatican Museums, Photo by Catherine Hadler


Portrait of a Young Woman (detail), Nicolaes Eliasz. Pickenoy, 1632

Portrait of a Young Woman (detail), Nicolaes Eliasz. Pickenoy, 1632

historicaltimes:

Son runs to say goodbye to his father, who is going to fight in the II World War
YellowKazooie:


I wonder if his dad ever made it back home

historicaltimes:

Son runs to say goodbye to his father, who is going to fight in the II World War

YellowKazooie:

I wonder if his dad ever made it back home

T H E M E