Praeteritum Imperfectum
My name is Alice, I’m 18 years old and I’ve been in love with history and art ever since my parents accompanied me around numerous national trust properties when I was 3.

At the moment I’m studying my A-levels in History, Archaeology and HIstory of Art, and am currently reading a lot of books on Renaissance art whilst also catching up on the modern art movements from Cubism onwards.

I’m also a lover of all period dramas…if you ever need the boxset of North and South or Larkrise to Candleford you know where to come).

My blog (in short) is a mish mash of history, archaeology and history of art…but mainly history of art. It doesn’t have a fixed theme, I just post interesting pictures, stories and tales from my travels….whilst giving you updates on upcoming exhibitions and new discoveries in the historical world.

So, welcome and enjoy!
Click on a topic to find more posts (this page is under construction)

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lonequixote:

Dance Class at the Opera ~ Edgar Degas

lonequixote:

Dance Class at the Opera ~ Edgar Degas

Posted 1 week ago with 1,224 notes - reblog
femme-de-lettres:

Large (Wikimedia)
While still recognizably his aesthetic, After the Duel marks a nearly complete departure from Antonio Mancini's usual mode.
Instead of a nuanced image of poverty, the 1872 painting focuses on a heightened, theatrical moment in the life of a wealthy child.
A white shirt smeared with bloody hand-prints drapes over a chair, a sword cutting across the composition from beneath it.
Meanwhile, the shadow of a man leans towards the frightened subject as the latter averts his gaze.
The narrative isn’t perfectly clear. Perhaps the unseen man is the child’s father, injured in the titular duel? Perhaps, instead, he’s some third party, come to explain the fatal result to a now fatherless son?
In any case, the result is a strikingly cinematic painting that would find itself perfectly at home on the cover of a Dashiell Hammett novel.

femme-de-lettres:

Large (Wikimedia)

While still recognizably his aesthetic, After the Duel marks a nearly complete departure from Antonio Mancini's usual mode.

Instead of a nuanced image of poverty, the 1872 painting focuses on a heightened, theatrical moment in the life of a wealthy child.

A white shirt smeared with bloody hand-prints drapes over a chair, a sword cutting across the composition from beneath it.

Meanwhile, the shadow of a man leans towards the frightened subject as the latter averts his gaze.

The narrative isn’t perfectly clear. Perhaps the unseen man is the child’s father, injured in the titular duel? Perhaps, instead, he’s some third party, come to explain the fatal result to a now fatherless son?

In any case, the result is a strikingly cinematic painting that would find itself perfectly at home on the cover of a Dashiell Hammett novel.

Posted 2 weeks ago with 547 notes - reblog
andrewfishman:

Tracey Emin, “My Bed,” 1998
*Trigger warning: depression/suicide*
This work of art shows the artist at her most vulnerable and is extremely effective at showing just how dark this time in her life was.  
Emin had just gone through a troubled patch in a relationship and had sunk into a suicidal depression.  She did not leave her bed for several days.  When she finally overcame this bout with depression, she decided to display the bed itself, in its pitiful state, covered in filthy clothes, condoms, empty bottles of liquor, and cigarettes.  She placed it in a gallery and explained its context in her life.  
It became immediately controversial, with some claiming she was simply playing the part of a “bad girl” and others decrying it as less than art.  Many objected in particular to the bodily fluids included.  Emin’s genius has always necessarily been along the thin line between art and confession.  She constantly tells the viewer much more about herself than others ever share, particularly about the struggles in her life.  
This piece is successful because it shares an experience with the viewer in an incredibly succinct way.  Emin’s bed shows us just how low a person can get.  The fact that she survived the experience and has had a successful career since has transformed the piece over time.  It is no longer a piece which only shows us the face of depression; it gives us hope that one can get out of that bed and lead a fulfilling life.  
Visit her website here.

andrewfishman:

Tracey Emin, “My Bed,” 1998

*Trigger warning: depression/suicide*

This work of art shows the artist at her most vulnerable and is extremely effective at showing just how dark this time in her life was.  

Emin had just gone through a troubled patch in a relationship and had sunk into a suicidal depression.  She did not leave her bed for several days.  When she finally overcame this bout with depression, she decided to display the bed itself, in its pitiful state, covered in filthy clothes, condoms, empty bottles of liquor, and cigarettes.  She placed it in a gallery and explained its context in her life.  

It became immediately controversial, with some claiming she was simply playing the part of a “bad girl” and others decrying it as less than art.  Many objected in particular to the bodily fluids included.  Emin’s genius has always necessarily been along the thin line between art and confession.  She constantly tells the viewer much more about herself than others ever share, particularly about the struggles in her life.  

This piece is successful because it shares an experience with the viewer in an incredibly succinct way.  Emin’s bed shows us just how low a person can get.  The fact that she survived the experience and has had a successful career since has transformed the piece over time.  It is no longer a piece which only shows us the face of depression; it gives us hope that one can get out of that bed and lead a fulfilling life.  

Visit her website here.

Posted 3 weeks ago with 471 notes - reblog

thesoftghetto:

We’ve all heard of Betty Boop. But how many of you knew that she was based off of a BLACK woman.

Yes Betty Boop was based off of Ms.Esther Jones known by her stage name “Baby Esther”. She was an African-American singer and entertainer of the 1920’s. Her singing trademark was “Boop oop da doop” hence the name Betty Boop! She performed regularly at the cotton club in Harlem,New York.

Source

steulalia:

Guillaume de Harsigny (1300–1393), was a French doctor and court physician to the Charles V of France. One of the most notable physicians of his day, at age 92 Harsigny played a crucial role in the recovery of Charles VI of France from a coma brought about by a fit of insanity. Following his death in 1393, Harsigny was buried in a tomb at Laon which featured one of the earliest examples of medieval cadaver tomb sculpture

steulalia:

Guillaume de Harsigny (1300–1393), was a French doctor and court physician to the Charles V of France. One of the most notable physicians of his day, at age 92 Harsigny played a crucial role in the recovery of Charles VI of France from a coma brought about by a fit of insanity. Following his death in 1393, Harsigny was buried in a tomb at Laon which featured one of the earliest examples of medieval cadaver tomb sculpture

Posted 1 month ago with 399 notes - reblog

brucitas:

REMAKE

Posted 1 month ago with 702 notes - reblog

alex-aki-art:

Louise Ingram Rayner (21 June 1832 – 8 October 1924) was a British watercolor artist. She lived in Chester in the Welsh Marches but travelled extensively, painting British scenes, during the summers in 1870s and 1880s. Her paintings are very detailed and highly picturesque populated street scenes capturing the “olde worlde” character of British towns and cities in the booming Victorian period.

americangothgirl:

During WWII, Irena got permission to work in the Warsaw ghetto, as a Plumbing/Sewer specialist. She had an ulterior motive.Irena smuggled Jewish infants out in the bottom of the tool box she carried. She also carried a burlap sack in the back of her truck, for larger kids.Irena kept a dog in the back that she trained to bark when the Nazi soldiers let her in and out of the ghetto. The soldiers, of course, wanted nothing to do with the dog and the barking covered the kids/infants noises.During her time of doing this, she managed to smuggle out and save 2500 kids/infants. Ultimately, she was caught, however, and the Nazi’s broke both of her legs and arms and beat her severely.Irena kept a record of the names of all the kids she had smuggled out, In a glass jar that she buried under a tree in her back yard. After the war, she tried to locate any parents that may have survived and tried to reunite the family. Most had been gassed. Those kids she helped got placed into foster family homes or adopted.In 2007 Irena was up for the Nobel Peace Prize. She was not selected. Al Gore won, for a slide show on Global Warming.

americangothgirl:

During WWII, Irena got permission to work in the Warsaw ghetto, as a Plumbing/Sewer specialist. She had an ulterior motive.

Irena smuggled Jewish infants out in the bottom of the tool box she carried. She also carried a burlap sack in the back of her truck, for larger kids.

Irena kept a dog in the back that she trained to bark when the Nazi soldiers let her in and out of the ghetto. The soldiers, of course, wanted nothing to do with the dog and the barking covered the kids/infants noises.

During her time of doing this, she managed to smuggle out and save 2500 kids/infants. Ultimately, she was caught, however, and the Nazi’s broke both of her legs and arms and beat her severely.

Irena kept a record of the names of all the kids she had smuggled out, In a glass jar that she buried under a tree in her back yard. After the war, she tried to locate any parents that may have survived and tried to reunite the family. Most had been gassed. Those kids she helped got placed into foster family homes or adopted.

In 2007 Irena was up for the Nobel Peace Prize. 
She was not selected. 
Al Gore won, for a slide show on Global Warming.

Archaeological dig finds massive slave quarters in Crownsville

archaeologicalnews:

image

When archaeologists began digging around Rockbridge Academy in May, they expected to find the place where the Comte de Rochambeau camped in September 1781 on the way to Yorktown and the final major battle of the Revolutionary War.

Instead, they stumbled upon something very different.

Slave…

Posted 2 months ago with 213 notes - reblog
ancientpeoples:

Gold necklace with beads in shape of lotus flowers and leaves
Cypriot Period, unknown.
Source: Metropolitan Museum

ancientpeoples:

Gold necklace with beads in shape of lotus flowers and leaves

Cypriot Period, unknown.

Source: Metropolitan Museum

Posted 3 months ago with 551 notes - reblog
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