A single tooth can tell a lot about ancient people →

archaeologicalnews:

What can you learn from a single tooth? Quite a lot, actually.

University of Toronto archaeologist Susan Pfeiffer and an international team of scholars are recovering DNA as well as chemical isotopes from ancient American Indian teeth to sort out what happened in the northern Iroquoian…

thisblueboy:

Attributed to Hagesandros, Athenedoros and Polydoros, Laocoon and his Sons, Early First Century B.C.E., Vatican Museums, Photo by Catherine Hadler

thisblueboy:

Attributed to Hagesandros, Athenedoros and Polydoros, Laocoon and his Sons, Early First Century B.C.E., Vatican Museums, Photo by Catherine Hadler


Portrait of a Young Woman (detail), Nicolaes Eliasz. Pickenoy, 1632

Portrait of a Young Woman (detail), Nicolaes Eliasz. Pickenoy, 1632

historicaltimes:

Son runs to say goodbye to his father, who is going to fight in the II World War
YellowKazooie:


I wonder if his dad ever made it back home

historicaltimes:

Son runs to say goodbye to his father, who is going to fight in the II World War

YellowKazooie:

I wonder if his dad ever made it back home

ancientpeoples:

Corinthian Type Bronze Helmet
600-550 BC
Archaic Greek
(Source: The British Museum)

ancientpeoples:

Corinthian Type Bronze Helmet

600-550 BC

Archaic Greek

(Source: The British Museum)

theatlantic:

This Man Took 445 Photobooth Portraits of Himself Over 30 Years, and Nobody Knows Why

For three decades, starting in the 1930s, he did the same thing. He’d sit inside a photo booth. He’d smile. He’d pose. 
And then—pop! pop! pop!—out would pop a glossy self-portrait, in shades of black and white. There he was, staring back at himself … and grinning. And, sometimes, almost scowling. There he was, mirthful. And, sometimes, almost scornful.  
The man—nobody knows who he was—repeated this process 455 times, at least, and he did so well into the 1960s. Nobody knows for sure why he did it. Or where he did it. All we know is that he took nearly 500 self-portraits over the course of thirty years, at a time when taking self-portraits was significantly more difficult than it is today, creating a striking record of the passage of time. 
The man’s effort is now being shared with the public in the form of a collection being shown at Rutgers’ Zimmerli Art Museum in New Brunswick. “445 Portraits of a Man,” the exhibit is appropriately called, takes these early, earnest selfies and presents them as art. 
Read more. [Image courtesy Donald Lokuta]

theatlantic:

This Man Took 445 Photobooth Portraits of Himself Over 30 Years, and Nobody Knows Why

For three decades, starting in the 1930s, he did the same thing. He’d sit inside a photo booth. He’d smile. He’d pose. 

And then—pop! pop! pop!—out would pop a glossy self-portrait, in shades of black and white. There he was, staring back at himself … and grinning. And, sometimes, almost scowling. There he was, mirthful. And, sometimes, almost scornful.  

The man—nobody knows who he was—repeated this process 455 times, at least, and he did so well into the 1960s. Nobody knows for sure why he did it. Or where he did it. All we know is that he took nearly 500 self-portraits over the course of thirty years, at a time when taking self-portraits was significantly more difficult than it is today, creating a striking record of the passage of time. 

The man’s effort is now being shared with the public in the form of a collection being shown at Rutgers’ Zimmerli Art Museum in New Brunswick. “445 Portraits of a Man,” the exhibit is appropriately called, takes these early, earnest selfies and presents them as art.

Read more. [Image courtesy Donald Lokuta]

Collection of historical maps of Saint-Domingue (Haiti). View more and here

tierradentro:

“Ugolino and his Sons”, 1867, Jean-Baptiste Carpeaux.

tierradentro:

Ugolino and his Sons”, 1867, Jean-Baptiste Carpeaux.

ancientpeoples:

Terracotta vase in shape of a rooster 
The inscription is the Etruscan alphabet and is it likely that the vase contained ink. It is 10.3cm high (4 1/16 inch.) 
Etruscan, Archaic Period, 650 - 600 BC. 
Source: Metropolitan Museum 

ancientpeoples:

Terracotta vase in shape of a rooster 

The inscription is the Etruscan alphabet and is it likely that the vase contained ink. It is 10.3cm high (4 1/16 inch.) 

Etruscan, Archaic Period, 650 - 600 BC. 

Source: Metropolitan Museum 

historicaltimes:

RMS Titanic presents an impressive silhouette from the starboard side, April 1912

historicaltimes:

RMS Titanic presents an impressive silhouette from the starboard side, April 1912

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